6 Areas Where Data Really Matters!

We have witnessed almost daily, for the past year, a battle between those who embrace science and data and those who deny the numbers and what the related science indicates, about this terrible pandemic. It is not possible to ignore or deny the facts of the numbers. This situation seems obvious, but there are many situations/ areas in our lives where wise leaders understand and embrace relevant statistics/ data. Lesser ones, however, are ignored, denied, or fail to recognize their importance. This article will briefly examine, review, and then discuss 4 areas where effective use of these numbers and understanding why they matter, with the public and elected officials.
1. Pandemic: The most obvious example of this is the relationship and necessity/ relevance during the pandemic. It is important to use testing and tracking to determine the severity of the disease and to guide you in your efforts to reduce the infection rate. This is a high rate, even though President Trump has stated that it was low because we tested so many times. The reality is that we must be proactive and make a difference for the better. It makes no sense to ignore or deny the staggering statistics regarding hospitalizations, deaths and cases. All cases are not equal in terms of their risk. Those who end up in hospital visits, especially if there is a need for an Intensive Care Unit are the most at-risk. These numbers can be used to help you use the best public health measures more efficiently.
2. Employment/ unemployment:It is important to pay more attention, not to the interpretations, to raw data. The official Unemployment rate is almost always lower than the actual number of people. This is because the government numbers do not include those who are no longer eligible for Unemployment Insurance and/or those who find less lucrative jobs in terms of salary, securities, or level. It is important to consider income growth when referring to the high employment rate.

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Employment/ unemployment: It is important to pay more attention, not to the interpretations, to raw data. The official Unemployment rate is almost always lower than the actual number of people. This is because the government numbers do not include those who are no longer eligible for Unemployment Insurance and/or those who find less lucrative jobs in terms of salary, securities, or level. It is important to consider income growth when referring to the high employment rate.
It is important to consider income growth when referring to the high employment rate.
3. Salaries and other categories is crucial to compare salaries to the inflation rate and other factors when analyzing them. True leaders also realize that there is still a significant gap in terms of gender/ sexuality, age-related, race/ethnicity, and so forth. These salary gaps can be addressed realistically.
4. CPI/ Consumer Price IndexDid you know that the actual inflation rate is significantly different from the Consumer Price Index (CPI). These numbers may include or exclude certain expenses that are not included in the Consumer Price Index (CPI). This could be different from what we feel.
Data is subject to restrictions and data only becomes meaningful when/if officials know what it means and what it doesn’t. It makes sense that the public benefits from well-prepared, knowledgeable leaders.
Richard has owned several businesses, served as a CEO, COO, Director of Development and consultant. He also managed events professionally, provided advice to thousands, and conducted personal development seminars. Rich is the author of three books and thousands upon articles.

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